The Miseducation of Cameron Post: Big Timber Waterslide Park

Back then Big Timber still had the only water park in Montana, and it sat right alongside the interstate. When we passed, I craned to see the strange toothpaste-green looping slides as they towered out of a field house cement vats of too-blue water. The place was packed….

Everything was heightened the way it always is when summer is slipping away to fall, and you’re younger than eighteen, and all you can do is suck your cherry Icee and let the chlorine sting your nose, all the way up into the pockets behind your eyes, and snap your towel at the pretty girl with the sunburn, and hope to do it all again come June. (259)

Emily M. Danforth. The Miseducation of Cameron Post. New York: HarperCollins, 2012.

About the Book

The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Set in rural Montana in the early 1990s, The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a coming-of-age novel about a pre-teen girl who is discovering her own homosexuality. After her parents die in a car crash, Cameron comes to live with her old-fashioned grandmother and ultraconservative aunt. She develops a relationship with her best friend, a beautiful cowgirl, but once she is outed she is sent to God’s Promise, a “de-gaying” camp where Cameron comes face to face with the cost of denying her true identity.

Visit www.emdanforth.com to explore a virtual version of Cameron Post’s dollhouse, watch the book trailer, follow fictional Tumblr accounts for the book’s characters, and find a book club guide.

While the settings in The Miseducation of Cameron clearly reference actual locales, it is understood that the book—including its places—is ultimately the product of the author’s imagination. The intent of this literary map is to enrich the reading experience by interpreting those places, not to render them literally or definitively.

About the Author

Emily M. Danforth

Emily M. Danforth was born and raised in Miles City, Montana. She has an MFA in fiction from the University of Montana and a PhD in creative writing from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her short fiction has won the International Queer Writing Award from the U.K.’s Chroma Magazine, and the George Garret Award from Willow Springs. She teaches creative writing and literature courses at Rhode Island College in Providence.

Menu