Montana Authors Project

Welcome to the Montana Authors Project

Explore settings in favorite Montana literature using the interactive map below.
Use the filter bar to see specific book locations.

Book Title
Loading

Along toward the middle of the day, beyond where even a trickle of water ran, Boone climbed the last lift to the divide. One way the land pitched down to Oregon, to the Flathead and Clark's Fork and the Columbia and the western sea; the other, it fell off to the Marias and Missouri, to Blackfoot country and Red Horn's band and Teal Eye carrying his young one in her. It was strange that a man could go off and leave a part of him living behind him and have no power over it and no say-so but only the knowledge that there was a live piece of him that wasn't with him. (295)…


Along Wyoming Street houses of prostitution thrived, the lavish Dumas Brothel and Venus Alley, where women plied their trade in thin-framed cribs, a line of double-decked openings attached to the back wall of buildings, fronted by a curtain, a single lightbulb over each entrance. (132)…


Where the ridge leveled off, he spurred the horse to a gallop and pulled up short before the outer gate. A Frenchman peeked through the pickets and swung the gate open to let him through and closed it tight afterwards. "Where's the customers?" Jim asked. The Frenchman gestured with his hands, saying only God knew. A clerk eyed Jim, his hands palms down on the counter. "Only customers we get these days are ugly customers," he said. (328)…


In accord with the Catholic sisters at the school outside Lame Deer, Evelynne Lowry in a white lace dress with hat and veil was promised to William Black Kettle in black suit, white shirt, black vest, and bolo tie with a turquoise stone. (281)…


It was known country to Summers, the Wind range was, the everlasting snow fields and the Grand Teton that could come into sight soon, known country and old country to him now. He could remember when it was new, and a man setting foot on it could believe he was the first one, and a man seeing it could put names to it. That was in the days of General Ashley and Provot and Jed Smith, the cool half-parson whom the Comanches had killed down on the Cimarron. (193)…


The rodeo in Mizpah was like most, hard riding and filled with ranch hands, where women gathered with men as children ran the outskirts trying to mimic the feats of the cowboys. There was only one bar in Mizpah, the Steerhorn.…


To the east, where the hill and sky met, Boone saw a surge of movement and guessed that it was buffalo until it streamed down the slope, making for them, and came to be a horse herd. Summers' gray eye slipped from Boone to Uncle Zeb...."Forts all up and down the river, and folk everywhere a man might think to lay a trap. And greenhorns comin' up, a heap of ‘em—greenhorns on every boat, hornin' in and sp'ilin' the fun. Christ sake! Why'n't they stay to home? Why'n't they leave it to us as found it? By god, she's ours by rights...." (150)…


Outside, the flat of the high plains arced toward Canada. To the south the wild wind blew snow from here to a haze at the earth’s end. A rim of sun, westerly, was red as blood.…


It is a windy day in mid-August 1994, and nearly all the inhabitants of Yaak have gathered in the log church that doubles as our community center. We've had bake sales in this place and we've voted here. Today an army officer, heavyset and dressed in camouflage, is here to tell us how to keep from burning to death. Outside, copper-colored smoke and sunlight blend into a fog that won't go away. The air feels heavy around us as the lead apron that you used to wear during X-rays. (140)…


In summer it was the farm, and freedom and loneliness and the clean sharpening of the senses, the feeling of strong personal identity in the midst of a wide, cleanly-bounded world; but the rest of the year it was the town, sunk in its ancient river valley hemmed in by the bench hills, and that was another life.... That life centered around the three houses on the cutbank side of the west bend, and the bath houses behind, on the bank, that the boy got to use only for a short time in the spring. In winter they were used as storehouses by the three families in that end of the town. (238)…

Menu