Our Team

Click on each team member’s image to learn more.

Humanities Montana Team Members

Spring Board Meeting
February 9-11, 2023
Great Falls

John Knight

john.knight@humanitiesmontana.org

(406) 243-4649

John Knight joined Humanities Montana in June of 2022 after many years of working in the arts as a museum professional, independent curator, and artist. Born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, John has a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in Sculpture from the University of Cincinnati, and a Masters of Fine Arts in Visual Studies from Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon, where he co-directed two art galleries before moving to Montana in 2017. He has exhibited his own art nationally and internationally, and has worked regionally as an arts professional with the Open AIR artist residency program and the Missoula Art Museum. John is thrilled to bring his experiences in the arts to Humanities Montana. He believes that the humanities serve to build strong and diverse communities throughout the state of Montana.

John Knight

Programs Manager

Julie Ramone

julie.ramone@humanitiesmontana.org

Julie Ramone joined Humanities Montana in May 2022 and is excited to bring her years of nonprofit and tribal program experience to the team. She attended the University of Montana in Missoula and Montana State University in Bozeman and completed a BS degree. Julie believes that the humanities support diversity, equity and inclusion.

Julie Ramone

Office Manager

Sara Stout

sara.stout@humanitiesmontana.org

(406) 243-5807

Sara was raised on the east coast and earned her B.A.Sc. with a concentration in History from the Wilkes Honors College in Florida. She has lived in many states due to her father’s career in the U.S. military but has called Montana home since 2010 when she moved here as an AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer. Sara fell in love with all Montana has to offer and was committed to continuing her work with nonprofit organizations after completing her national year of service. She has worked with local, state, and national nonprofits across the state and enjoys connecting individuals and communities with causes they are passionate about. Outside of the office, Sara loves exploring Montana and looks forward to sharing this great state with her son.

Sara Stout

Development Director

Megan Sundy

megan.sundy@humanitiesmontana.org

(406) 243-6067

Megan J. Hill Sundy is the grants manager at Humanities Montana. She supports innovative humanities focused organizations in local Montana communities through grants counseling and participatory grant-making. She moved to Montana in 2001 to earn a BA in Classics and a BA in Liberal Studies from the University of Montana. Since that time, Megan has been serving Montanans across the state developing, implementing, and evaluating nonprofit programs in underserved and underrepresented communities. To honor her deep connection with Montana’s landscape and rich sense of community, she obtained an MS in Measurement and Evaluation from American University in 2020 to ensure that community voices are heard and real needs are addressed. Megan is a champion for humanities as a means to bring people and communities together to examine, reflect, and understand the human experience.

Megan Sundy

Grants Manager

Randi Lynn Tanglen, Ph.D.

randi.tanglen@humanitiesmontana.org

(406) 243-4043

Born in Sidney, Randi has a B.A. in English Education from Rocky Mountain College and an M.A. in English from the University of Montana. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and was an English professor at Austin College in Texas for 12 years. There she served as director of the Robert and Joyce Johnson Center for Faculty Development and Excellence in Teaching, director of the Gender Studies Program, and interim chair of the English Department. She has written and lectured widely on pre-1900 U.S. women and minority writers, the captivity literature of the United States, and literature and social justice. Her co-edited volume with Dr. Brady Harrison of the University of Montana, Teaching Western American Literature, appeared from University of Nebraska Press in June 2020. Randi passionately believes that a strong and diverse democracy needs the ideas, stories, and dialogue inspired by the humanities.

Randi Tanglen

Executive Director

Jodi Todd

hm.accountant@humanitiesmontana.org

Jodi joined the Humanities Montana staff in 2019 and is excited to bring her years of accounting experience to the team.

Jodi Todd

Accountant

Taylor Willmarth

hm.intern@humanitiesmontana.org

Taylor Willmarth is an undergraduate student at the University of Montana studying political science and journalism, with an emphasis in international affairs. He joined Humanities Montana in fall 2022 as the Social Media Intern. Taylor grew up in Great Falls and has worked with many nonprofit organizations across the state. He was a high school fellow with the Forward Montana Foundation, and founded and served as chair of the Great Falls Chapter of Montana Youth Action. In 2021, Taylor spoke on the power of youth in politics in the Why It Matters series hosted by Humanities Montana. He is looking forward to learning valuable skills through his internship with the organization this year, while simultaneously contributing to a cause he believes in.

Taylor Willmarth

Social Media Intern

Humanities Montana Board Members

Years in parenthesis are term ending dates
*Governor’s appointees

Caroline Bitz

Caroline Bitz, recently retired from farming and ranching in northern Montana, has been an advocate of literacy and the arts in her rural communities. She received her education from Riverside Community College and Northern Montana College.

Caroline Bitz

Belgrade (2022)

Glory Blue Earth-Highley

Glory was born and raised in Great Falls, Montana. After high school, she moved to North Carolina where she met her spouse and the father of her three daughters. She comes from a military family—with all branches represented—and is immensely proud of her veteran family members.

Glory and her family were living history interpreters at the Outdoor History Museum in Nevada City, Montana under the guidance of Dan Thyer. The focus was daily life in the mining community, specifically Native American women in mining camps, marriage, and family culture. At that time, she lived in Anaconda and volunteered reading and teaching Native American studies in the schools, focusing on integrative art and hands-on learning. She was part of the Anaconda Coalition for Tolerance Education, helping coordinate Native American education for the community. She also advocated for the Arthritis Foundation, as her daughter is diagnosed with Polyarticular JIA. Senator Steve Daines told her daughter’s story on the Senate Floor, helping CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Program)—a bipartisan initiative—to be reauthorized for six years. Her daughter was his guest at the State of the Union Address. Glory is a member and registered Sioux with the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes through her mother’s lineage.

In 2015, she completed her 1000-hour degree in massage therapy from Healthworks Institute in Bozeman. She maintains a small practice in Deer Lodge and works for Rock Creek Cattle Company and Whispering Willows Spa as a massage therapist. She is an apprentice healer with a focus on healing the mind, body, and spirit. Glory currently is the president of the Montana Chapter of the American Massage Therapy Association. She also sits on a community board for Friends of Law Enforcement Officers working to bridge the relationship between law enforcement officers and the community of Powell County.

Glory Blue Earth*

Deer Lodge (2024)

Carol Bradly

Carol Bradley was a newspaper reporter in her home state of Tennessee, New York and Washington DC before escaping to Montana 25 years ago to write for the Great Falls Tribune. She was a 2004 Nieman fellow at Harvard and is the author of two books about animal welfare. She lives in Great Falls with her husband, Steve L’Heureux, and a pair of rescued border collies.

Carol Bradley

Great Falls (2025)

Jeremy Carl

Jeremy Carl is a Senior Fellow at the Claremont Institute, a policy think tank devoted to restoring and promoting the principles of the American Founding.

Prior to joining Claremont, Jeremy worked for a decade as a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and served as a policy advisor to many national political figures. He also served as U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior and was a Presidential appointee to the National Board of Education Sciences.

Jeremy received a BA with distinction from Yale University. He holds an MPA from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

He has long had an interest in the humanities and is a supporter of the Gallatin County and Montana Historical societies and Montana Shakespeare in the Park.

He lives in Gallatin County with his wife and their five children where he loves spending time in the great Montana outdoors.

Jeremy Carl*

Bozeman (2024)

April Charlo

Rancher, business owner, mom, comedian, storyteller and Maternal Mental Health Advocate, April Iris Charlo is a proud Bitterroot Salish woman and a member the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. She recently co-founded “Snqweylmistn,” translated as “The Place Where One Does Their Best,” an organization that will take 30 children from the foster care system and raise them in an intentional community within “Forever Homes.” April credits her success to the decision 16 years ago to choose sobriety and is both humbled and honored to advance the development of Recovery Centers in Montana. Holder of an Associate’s Degree in Native American Studies, a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education, and a Master’s Degree in Education Leadership, her passion for Indigenous language revitalization is evidenced in her entertaining and informative Ted Talk at

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kuC_IemiCs

April Charlo

Charlo (2022)

Jennifer Corning

Jennifer Brevik Corning was adopted into Montana’s geography and rich culture 40 years ago. Completing undergraduate and graduate degrees in Billings, she has since worked in electronic and print media, grant writing, and public relations. Service as a trustee for organizations across the state has exposed her to the varied needs and aspirations of communities in Montana. Her free time is filled with family and friends, reading, hobbies, dogs, and any and all outdoor activities.

Jennifer Corning

Billings (2024)

David Dietrich

David Dietrich received his Juris Doctor (JD) from the University of Montana College of Law. He is a fourth generation Montanan with a diverse ranching, real estate and estate planning background. His Billings-based law firm, Dietrich &Associates, P.C., has provided real estate tax and estate planning services to the region for over 24 years. He is passionate about promoting and enhancing the appreciation (for grade school children through college students) of literacy and the performing arts, notably in the South Central and Eastern Montana region. David and his family enjoy living in the Big Sky Country; he is an avid outdoor digital camera user, skier and hiker.

David Dietrich

Billings (2024) – Vice Chair

Jamie Doggett

Jamie Doggett is a cattle rancher who grew up around Ringling and Harlowton and says the humanities changed her life. Doggett’s appreciation of her home and the people who live in Meagher County led her to serve her neighbors as Meagher County Commissioner for twelve years. She was active in county, state and national efforts to improve infrastructure, health care and voting rights. She and her husband Jock live 25 miles west of White Sulphur Springs where they have worked their cattle and land together for over thirty years. She calls it “Paradise.”

Jamie Doggett

White Sulphur Springs (2025)

Jeanette Fregulia

Jeanette M. Fregulia is the Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History in Carroll College, Helena, Montana. She holds an MA in Middle East Studies from the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies, and a Ph.D. in Renaissance History from the University of Nevada, Reno. Her research and publications center on commerce, trade, and cultural exchanges between Medieval/early modern Italy and the eastern Mediterranean, and also on the history of the Middle East and Islam. In addition to articles and book chapters, her first book, A Rich and Tantalizing Brew, a History of How Coffee Connected the World was published in March 2019, by the University of Arkansas Press. She has two additional books under advance contract with Taylor and Francis.

Jeanette Fregulia

Helena (2025)

Debbie Garland

Adjunct Professor University of Montana School of Education

M.Ed. 

Literacy and Reading Endorsement

Debbie Garland

Missoula (2022)

Lynda Grande

Lynda is from a fourth generation Meagher county cattle ranch established in 1878. She earned a degree in Ag Business from MSU and has served as an officer in state and local cattle organizations. One of three Montanans on the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, she sits on the Export Growth committee working to increase global demand for beef. History, art, music and community service have influenced her life since childhood. She is a graduate of REAL Montana and currently Chair of the Stillwater County Library board.

Lynda Grande

Columbus (2025)

Ramey Growing Thunder

Ramey Growing Thunder was born and raised on Fort Peck Indian Reservation and is a member of the Dakhota Nation and a Navajo descendent. After two years at Fort Peck Community College, she transferred to Montana State University-Northern in Havre and obtained her undergraduate degree in Education. With this degree, Growing Thunder returned home to work as a teacher for grades K-12. In addition, she worked as an instructor at Fort Peck Community College and taught native languages on the reservation, pushing hard to implement the language and culture of the Dakhota people. Since then, Growing Thunder has obtained a Master of Arts in Language, Literacy, and Socio-Cultural Studies from the University of New Mexico and is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Montana, working toward creating a culturally place-based K-12 education model.

Ramey Growing Thunder

Poplar (2024)

Carla Homstad

Carla Homstad has lived in Montana, both east and west of the divide, for most of her life. She earned her B.A. and M.A. in History from the University of Montana and worked as a consulting historian in Missoula for 20 years. In that capacity her work covered such topics as water rights, tribal histories, and cultural landscapes. She recently retired to focus more on writing poetry. She currently lives in Stevensville, the Bitterroot Mountains her constant companion.

Carla Homstad

Stevensville (2024) – Chair

Ashby Kinch

I am a professor of English literature specializing in the literature of the medieval period, particularly late medieval literature. I also study the history of lyric poetry and work in the field of translation studies, specifically Middle English translations of Latin and French writing in the fifteenth century. My book Imago Mortis: Mediating Images of Death in Late Medieval Culture (Brill, 2013) studies the art and literature of death and dying in the early 15th century.  I am also the editor of the medieval volume (800-1450) in the Bloomsbury series A Culture History of Death, forthcoming in 2020.  I have also published recent articles on neuroscience and literature, as well as word-image relations in both medieval literature and in the work of a contemporary American poet, Cole Swensen. Past work includes several articles and an edited collection on the French writer and diplomat Alain Chartier, the most influential European author of the 15th century. I am developing a project comparing the aesthetic structure and social dialectics of the Luttrell Psalter and Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. I am a co-PI on a Keck Foundation grant to develop an integrated curriculum in neuroscience across multiple disciplines. I serve on the Institute of Health and Humanities, and the Humanities Institute at the University of Montana. I have extended my research and thinking on death into public humanities projects, including funding from the Institute of Health and Humanities to develop writing workshops on death, and to produce a modern adaptation of a 15th century multi-media art form known as the “Dance of Death.” Since Fall 2017, I have served as Associate Dean of the Graduate School.

Ashby Kinch

Missoula (2022)

Lathie Poole

Lathie Poole has been a Montana resident for fifty years, applying her skills to ranching, running a clothing store and art gallery, and working as a fixed-base operator for the Madison County airport before she and her late husband, Lee, built Moonlight Basin ski resort from the ground up. Lathie also serves on the board of the Bozeman Art Museum and is an active member of her church.

Lathie Poole*

Bozeman (2024)

Laura Mitchell Ross

Laura Mitchell Ross is a retired attorney and Miles City native. She helps her husband with the operation of his 300 tree apple orchard in Fromberg, Montana.

Laura Mitchell Ross

Billings (2022)

Eric Sanders

Eric grew up in rural northcentral Montana on a wheat and barley farm north of Conrad. After graduating with a degree in accounting from San Diego State University in 1996, he began his career in the audit and tax practices of Ernst & Young in their San Diego and San Francisco offices. Later, Eric served as a financial analyst for a publicly-traded pharmaceutical company in the Bay Area, worked as an auditor with KPMG’s Berlin office, and taught business English in Germany. After relocating to the Pacific Northwest in 2004 and managing the finances and operations of a small Seattle-based company, he joined Humanities Washington in 2006, where he has since served in various financial and administrative roles. He became a Certified Public Accountant/CPA in 2011. Eric moved back to his family’s farm in December 2019 and has enjoyed reconnecting with Montana and everything this beautiful and vast state has to offer.

Eric Sanders

Conrad (2022)

Francine Spang-Willis

Francine D. Spang-Willis is of Cheyenne, Pawnee, and settler descent. She is an oral historian, business owner, and educator based in Bozeman, Montana. She enjoys engaging with the landscape through hiking, fishing, skiing, and occasionally ice climbing.

Spang-Willis graduated from the Oral History Master of Arts (OHMA) program at Columbia University in 2021. Her thesis, Becoming Wild Again in America: The Restoration and Resurgence of the Pablo-Allard Bison Herd, was cited as a thesis of exceptional distinction in the OHMA program’s 2021 Jeffrey H. Brodsky Oral History competition. She served as an Obama Presidency Oral History Fellow from 2019 to 2020. She also holds a Master of Arts in Native American Studies from Montana State University and a Bachelor of Science in Business Management from Rocky Mountain College.

As the owner of Appearing Flying Woman Consulting, LLC, she collaborates with diverse organizations, communities, and individuals on oral history and community-centered projects. Various organizations have also invited her to share her knowledge and expertise on oral tradition, oral history, project design, settler colonialism processes, Cheyenne leadership, and bison and land recovery and restoration. She also has had diverse roles in higher education, the US federal government, and the nonprofit sector.

Francine Spang-Willis

Bozeman (2024)

Esther Beth Sullivan

Dr. Esther “Beth” Sullivan grew up in Livingston, Great Falls, and Bozeman. She loved visiting her grandparents and extended families in Lima and Helena. The daughter of two amazing Montana teachers, she and each of her siblings went on to become teachers themselves. Beth earned her bachelor’s degree at Rocky Mountain College, and then taught middle school language arts in Missoula. She pursued graduate school in theatre studies at Washington State University (MA) and University of Washington (Ph.D.). From there she taught as a faculty member in the Theatre Department at Ohio State University and served in various administrative roles for 16 years. When she married a fellow Rocky alum who happened to live in Alaska, she moved to Anchorage where she began work as the director for the Rural Alaska Native and Adult Distance Education Program at Alaska Pacific University (APU). Over nearly 14 years at APU, she served as faculty member, program director, department chairperson, and academic dean. At the end of 2018, she and her husband retired and returned to Montana. Across her career from Montana to Ohio and Alaska, she is proud to have developed academic programs that expanded access particularly for first generation, rural, and Indigenous students. She is also proud of the work she did to integrate cultural studies across curricular offerings, especially through the arts. She is happy to be back in Montana, living close to Rocky, in the shadows of the Rims, under the brilliant Billings sky – and humbled to be working on the board of Humanities Montana.

Esther Beth Sullivan

Billings (2024)